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Friday, August 10, 2012

The Saint Louis Cookbook

I'm thrilled to be sharing a rather unique cookbook with you today. I think it's the perfect day too because on this day in 1821, the Show Me State, otherwise known as Missouri, became the 24th state in the good ol' USA! And since St. Louis is one of Missouri's largest city, what better way to get a taste of Missouri than with The Saint Louis Cookbook: Bicentennial Issue!

This particular edition of The Saint Louis Cookbook is the Bicentennial edition. It's "a selection of recipes chosen from favorites of friends of the St. Louis Symphony; music lovers, orchestra members, guest artists and celebrities from all over the world who came to help St. Louis celebrate her 200th birthday." (The city of St. Louis was founded by Pierre Laclede Liguest on February 15, 1764.)

Before we begin our journey, you might want to read about the Foods of Saint Louis. Some are foods found only in St. Louis, while others are those which became popular there before spreading both east and west. Take the legend of the infamous Hot Dog for instance. I must apologize for not showing a picture of the Jean Baptiste Roy Home, (legendary birth place of the hot dog) it just wouldn't scan clearly:)

It seems that St. Louis lays claim to the invention of the Planter's Punch also. There is a prominent culinary historian by the name of Robert F. Moss in Charleston South Carolina that would beg to differ:)

Here's another punch recipe, this one from the 7-UP Company Test Kitchen is non-alcholic.

What about this recipe if you just happen to have an old coffee can hanging around:)

Croquignoles are rich crisp twisted donuts, sometimes spiced with nutmeg. I found a few updated recipes online but this one from the Federation of Quebec Maple Syrup Producers really caught my eye.

Here's another recipe with an unusual name, Cat's Tongue Cookies. (Lenguas de Gato) They remind me a little of my favorite Pepperidge Farm Milano Cookie. I bet if you sandwiched two cookies together and filled it with Nutella or a little jam, it would come pretty darn close.

The Saint Louis Cookbook on the history of Angel Food Cake.


The Saint Louis Cookbook was first published in 1954 as the Symphony Cookbook. It was brought to light by a woman named Mrs. J. Eldred Newton. Mrs. Eldred contributed this recipe for a Glamorous After-Symphony Ring Mold to the book.

I hope you've enjoyed this stroll through St. Louis food history. There are so many things I wanted to share but alas, time is a going. I think I will tuck this book aside until April of next year just in time to celebrate the opening of the St. Louis World's Fair in 1904. Thanks for visiting everyone! I'll be catching up on all your delicious posts this weekend so, be ready!!! Happy S'mores Day! Louise

S'mores on a Stick

Resources:
1. Missouri "The Show Me State" at The Library of Congress @librarycongress
2. Timeline of Missouri History: 1820-1829
3. State Symbols of Missouri
4. Historical recipes of Ste. Genevieve, Missouri
5. Step by Step Directions Cat's Tongue Cookies from The Colors of Indian Cooking

52 comments:

  1. One of my favorite cookbooks is a symphony fundraiser. Sadly, it was a gift and at the moment, I can't tell you which symphony...

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  2. What a beautiful cookbook my friend - I love the recipes and the little musical touch :D

    Cheers
    Choc Chip Uru

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  3. Lovely and amaxing post dear Louise; love Lenguas de gato I wanna make these:)
    Have a niceweekend!

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    1. Oh I hope you do make them Gloria and when you do, I'll be wishing you would share some with me!

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    2. Yes of course we eat lenguas de gato with ice cream!

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  4. Great post, Louise! I've never been to St. Louis, but I'm about ready to hope the next flight for some Angel Food Cake? Who knew it came from St. Louis, along with Planters Punch and the Hot Dog! I never really thought about the fact that someone must have invented the hot dog, but bless Antoine for his ingenuity!

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    1. Thanks T.W. I've only breezed through St. Louis in my travels but it is on my someday list. I didn't even touch on all the goodies the book credits St. Louis natives with "inventing" I'm saving that for the World's Fair!!!

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  5. What fun looking twisty doughnuts!

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    1. Twisty donuts may just be my new best favorite, Yummy!!!

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  6. I almost fainted when I saw the word "Christmas" but the s'mores took me back to summer! (Though I have noticed the days getting shorter)

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    1. That's funny, Inger. I thought the same thing when I scanned that flyer. I just had to include it though because it's more rare than the book itself!!!

      Thankfully they are forecasting above average temperatures well into October. Gee, I hope they're right. I'm not quite ready for shorter days yet:)

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  7. This is really interesting, Louise. As usual, I learn so much reading your posts :) Thanks for sharing.

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  8. What an interesting book and how funny looking at the way they used to write in those days.
    I have to say, I especially love the look of those cat's tongues. They are classic biscuits in Italy and are often used in cake making or just eaten on their own.

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    1. I'm sure you would bake some lovely Cat's Tongues, Alida. Do invite us over when you do:)

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  9. Great post! The cookbook looks like a winner, Louise, even if some of their claims for invention are not exactly true. :)

    Here's something odd: my daughter texted me the other day and asked if I had a recipe for Cat's Tongues! I'm forwarding this to her ASAP!

    Don't those Croquignoles look divine?
    And that parfait recipe? My mother used to make something similar with almond macaroons she mail ordered from Fralingers. Always thought it was delicious plus simple to make.

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    1. Oh how wonderful Barbara! I'm so glad your daughter was seeking out a recipe that I just happen to have hanging around!!! I hope she will be sharing when she bakes them up!!!

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  10. I was born in St.Louis, but I've never had most of the foods on that list. I note that they are "favorites" not claimed as original St.Louis inventions, of which there seem to be quite a few. Not mentioned: St. Louis Italian restaurant owners also invented toasted ravioli (now more often deep fried, and copied by Olive Garden). It would be neat if angel food cake were really invented in St.Louis -- I think most claims like that recur in other places, though I've never heard about angel cake. In particular, I think there's some competition for just about any "invention" at the Worlds Fair, though I don't know about the hot dog bun. The Worlds Fair boosters also claim the ice cream cone and the hamburger sometimes, I'm surprised that didn't come up.

    Fun post!

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    1. Thanks for all that info, Mae. I was actually going to go the Toasted Ravioli route with this post but since its only mentioned in the book once, I figured I go with the legends:) BTW, the odd thing about that toasted ravioli recipe is that it uses "can brined pack ravioli; beats the heck out of me!!! I tried to stay away from the World's Fair food St. Louis is renowned for claiming "fame" to but I will when I do that post in April.

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  11. I always learn something at your site. Love the term culinary historian...wouldn't that be a neat thing to have on a business card?

    Sharing this with my daughter-n-law as she loves S'Mores.

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    1. It certainly would be a "neat" thing to have on a business card, Tina. However, aren't we all "culinary historians" in one fashion or another??? The study of food is intrinsically bound to the study of the human race.~Culinary Historians of New York.

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  12. I love the way you put together a post. It has something for everyone. I remember making savory jello molds, many moons ago. They were good although I am not sure, I would like them nowadays.

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    1. And I love the way you always send some kindness each time you visit, Chaya. Thank you...

      Thank you for that wonderful Goat Cheese Month post too Chaya. It was delicious to visit:)

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  13. You motivated me. http://bizzybakesb.blogspot.com/2012/08/your-assignment-is.html

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  14. waw! What a lovely cook book: so special & in retro style too! :)
    The punches sound fabulous, even the non-alcoholic one! I learned a lot, again! Thank you, dear Louise!

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    1. Thank YOU dear Sophie. I learn so much about creative healthy cooking when I visit your blog:)

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  15. This is such a beautiful vintage cookbook! So may interesting recipes for which I have never heard!

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    1. Thank you Katerina. I'm so glad you enjoyed it. I must tell you how much I enjoyed my visit to your blog too. Your pictures of Greece and its delicious food and recipes made me long for just a nibble:)

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  16. I actually remember that cookbook! I haven't thought of it for ages. The Planter's Punch story, alas, is incorrect - I actually spent a fair amount of time recently looking into that for a post I did about that drink. It really is of Jamaican origin. But the Planter's Hotel was justly famous for its excellent food and drink. Does that cookbook contain the recipe for Mrs. Hulling's Split Lemon Cake, by chance? (Mrs. Hulling's was a cafeteria in St. Louis.) It's a great cake, and a local gourmet grocery has the recipe and makes the cake - but they're not sharing the recipe. Really fun read - thank you.

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    1. So glad you enjoyed this post, Kitchen and thanks for the additional info. I did give a check in the book for Mrs. Hulling's Split Lemon Cake but it isn't included in the book. There is a recipe for Mrs. Hulling's Cafeteria Cheesecake Salad which includes lemon gelatine., however, it appears to be a typical gelatin salad of the time. Let me know if you want it.

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  17. Got to try those cat tongue cookies :)

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  18. hi louise, tho st louis is so far away from where i love, it's interesting knowing a little bit on its food history especially reading about the hot dog and the gloves, i think he was a clever trader! i hope one day i can try making an angel cake too!

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    1. I know how you feel, Lena. When I visit your blog I just love learning about your cultural and its creative meals too. Isn't blogging just wonderful for taking down barriers!!! Let us know when you make that Angel Food Cake, we'd love to see it!!!

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  19. Wow, Interesting post, Louise! Antoine Feuchtwanger was a genius, inventing the hotdog!!!
    And thank you so much for the comment that you left over at my potted garden! Using egg shells is a great idea, I never think of that! I constantly bake, so no problem on the supply of egg shells!! Garlic smoothie sounds good to me, will try out this one too! Thank you, Louise, hope you have a lovely week!

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    1. You are more than welcome, Joyce. Anything to protect those growing radishes of yours, lol...let me know how it works out!!!

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  20. I wonder how snicker doodles got their name...

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    1. Good question Duckie. I always assumed they had something to do with a German cookie recipe because I remember reading once that the word snickerdoodle is a an English variation of a German word. I wasn't sure though so I found you this link, which I am now going to save for future reference. Check out http://bakememore.com/2008/12/29/tracing-the-history-of-the-snickerdoodle/ for more info.

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  21. So nice this cookbook...and I would love to try the croquignoles, sound and look so yummie!
    Thanks for sharing all this recipe Louise and hope you are having a wonderful week :)

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    1. Thank you for visiting, Juliana. I too would love to try those croquignoles. Perhaps someday:)

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  22. Louise, Such an interesting post…with wonderful facts!! I actually have this St Louis cookbook…I’ll have to dig it out and make those cat’s tongue cookies! Have a great day!!

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  23. What a great cookbook! I love the cat's tongue cookies! And those twisted donuts are calling my name too.

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    1. Thanks Reeni. It really is a cool book!

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  24. Love these throw backs, Louise!! YUMMY!!

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  25. What a fun post, but particularly for someone who is St. Louis born and raised. I have this cookbook, Louise. I got it back when I was in Junior High, I think. I started collecting cookbooks when I first took Home Ec (remember Home Ec? I wished they taught that today!), starting with anything of local interest. Those donuts would go great with my morning coffee. Wish I had some!

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    1. I didn't realize you were born and raised in St. Louis, Pattie. I wish I would have spent more time there but I plan on going back. I love this book and all it's tidbits too!!!

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  26. You have the best historic cookbook collection - I am not sure if I want a macaroon parfait or a smores on a stick

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    1. Thanks Johanna. I'm so glad you enjoyed your visit. I'd go with the Smores if I were you, lol...

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  27. cat's tongue cookies, eh? that's certainly not the most appetizing of names, but regardless of that, i think they'd be tasty!

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Through this wide opened gate,
none came to early,
none returned to late.

Thanks for dropping in...Louise