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Sunday, July 7, 2013

Happy Birthday Sliced Bread; Still Fresh at 85

Hi all! Grab a sandwich and a drink...


All Sorts of Sandwiches; Handi-Wrap 1965

We're off to Chillicothe, Missouri for the unveiling of thee sliced bread machine.


(Bread-slicing Machine Popular Science, 1930 (Wikipedia)

That's right everyone, The Grand River Historical Society, is hosting a ribbon cutting celebrating the arrival of a sliced bread machine by special delivery from the Smithsonian Museum today and we don't want to miss it!

"...The museum will open its new display "A Slice of America" featuring the second bread slicer invented and manufactured by Otto Rohwedder of Davenport, Iowa. Eighty-five years ago, on July 7, 1928, a Chillicothe bakery became the first place in the world to sell commercially-sliced bread. The bakery was owned and operated by Frank Bench and the machine was the invention of Otto F. Rohwedder, of Davenport, Iowa. The machine is believed to have been used for six months before wearing out due to heavy use."

Can you think of any better way to celebrate Sliced Bread's 85th Birthday? I surely can't.(I just realized, Marion has been around longer than sliced bread:)

Albeit a virtual trip but hey, we had a virtual picnic and that worked out just dandy! After all, sandwiches are like picnics, they come in all sorts of sizes and shapes. From the very long hero to the tiny bite size tea sandwich, anything that fits between two slices of bread, or sometimes three or more, is a sandwich in my book!

Imagine what it must have been like in the "olden" days when first you had to procure the ingredients then bake the bread. And then you had to slice it to boot! I don't know about you but I'm pretty crusty when it comes to slicing bread in a uniform manner. The invention of a machine that could slice bread in a uniform manner however, was all the news in the Chillicothe Constitution Tribune on Friday, July 6th in 1928. Here's an excerpt from the article.

Here's a video from The Baking Industry which shows the process of commercial bread baking in 1946.

But sliced bread is NOT only for sandwiches. Nope, just feast your eyes on this Deluxe Bridge Loaf from 1934!

That Deluxe Bridge Loaf, my friends, was "procured" from "The Only Bread Baked At The Chicago's World's Fair."

Wonder Bread!

While many of us are eating all kinds of bread stuffs these days with ease and accessibility, the arrival of sliced bread was welcomed with much enthusiasm. It is said the Continental Baking Company, the bakers of Wonder Bread, were the first to embrace the new "technology", so they also had the distinction of coining the phrase The Best Thing Since Sliced Bread.

"...By the 1930s, pre-sliced bread was fully commercialized, and standardization was reinforced by other inventions that required uniform slices, such as toasters. The common phrase, "the best thing since sliced bread," as a way of hyping a new product or invention may have come into use based on an advertising slogan for Wonder Bread, the first commercial manufacturer of pre-wrapped, pre-sliced bread. With such products rapidly penetrating the American home, automated bread-making was not only an invention benchmark, but also a key indicator of the mechanization of daily life from the 1930s onward." The Atlantic; February 8, 2012.

As we all know, July is National Picnic Month. (I really think today should be declared National Sliced Bread Day, but, who am I to say:) Well, it just wouldn't be right to leave you high and dry with out some sort of picnic lunch, now would it?

Okay, so it doesn't involve the slicing of bread but hey, it sure looks good doesn't it? From Step-by-Step Hot and Cold Sandwiches by Carol Bowen I offer you...

FYI: On January 18, 1943, commercial bakers stopped selling sliced bread after Claude R. Wickard, Secretary of Agriculture, banned the sale of sliced bread in the United States until the end of WWII.

Resources
1. Sliced Bread News (a list of resources for further research)
2. Slice Bread Banned (previous post)

64 comments:

  1. Interesting information !
    I couldn't imagine a world without sliced bread...

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    1. That makes two of us, Sketched! Thanks for visiting. Drop by anytime!

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  2. That was a fun read, Louise. Years ago, I made one of those stuffed bread dishes and presented it to my family and guests at a luncheon during the Christmas holidays. It was not a success. In fact, one of my nephews still teases me about it. I don't recall what the adults said about it, but the kids didn't like it. :)

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    1. Oh that' so funny, Barbara. If I recall, when we use to have our weekly couples Saturday night poker games, I may have made something quite similar. Since I can't remember it, I'm guessing it wasn't a hit. (or I'm having a moment:)

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  3. Funny how we just take some things for granted…like sliced bread! Very interesting post…you always seem to find all those little details I never knew. Happy Birthday, sliced bread, and to my brother who shares your day! Fun post, Louise! Have a great day!

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    1. It was a fun post to research, Kathy. I actually had to contain myself from making the post much too long. I'm learning:) Happy birthday to your brother Kathy born on Sliced Bread Day! I'm thinking he's getting something really delicious for his birthday dinner tonight or, you're going to bake him a sandwich cake, lol...

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  4. By the way, I love your new look! Very patriotic!

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    1. Thanks Kathy, I'm only "wearing" it for the month of July. Then I'll go back to my "normal" look. I sure do miss my sidebars!

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  5. Well, may I say this post is the greatest thing since sliced bread?!! I LOVE that Wonder Bread had a pavilion at the World's Fair. And I think I might have tasted that Bridge loaf once. I might even try to make it. Happy Sunday, Louise!

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    1. I was hoping you would say that, T.W. It seems to me it just had to be said:) I can see you making that Bridge Loaf for a Mad Men party. (did I get the name of the show right?)

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  6. Oh boy , do these sandwiches look good ... I will make the picnic sandwich , my kids will love sitting in the garden . Love all the valuable information you share ...:)

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    1. The Picnic Sandwich is a GTREAT sandwich for kids, Nee. Not bad for adults either. You know how messy they can be:) Thanks for popping by...

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  7. Fun post. I'm not a fan of sandwiches, but I do love fresh bread.

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    1. I'm a huge fan of sandwiches, Channon and fresh bread too!

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  8. I had no idea sliced bread was only 85 years old! We've gone backwards - we've been baking our own bread for almost a year now, which of course means we have to slice it ourselves. Not that tough. ;-) So much cool stuff in this post. I'll bet at one time Wonder Bread was the cat's meow. Now? Not so much. ;-) Really fun read - thanks.

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    1. Wonder Bread was indeed once the "cat's meow," John, not so much now. I haven't baked bread in so long, perhaps even before the bread slicer was invented, lol...Thanks for visiting...

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  9. This is a very interesting post Louise! I didn't know when and who invented a bread slicing machine. We just take things for granted these days. It certainly was a great invention! Buying ready sliced is just so convenient.
    I love the photos and love fresh breads too!

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    1. I can't even imagine what the world would be like without sliced bread, Alida. I'm actually surprised it took so long, lol...

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  10. Love this post, Louise, especially the Vegetarian Club!:-) Never knew how long sliced bread had been around, though.

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    1. So glad you enjiyed it, Nellie. It was a fun post to do!

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  11. Dear Louise, I love the pictures, recipes and the nostalgia. I don't know how I would feel if I could not buy the bread sliced. I suppose it is all what you get used to. I wish I could ask my mom or grandmother how they felt when slice bread was introduced. Thanks again for the knowledge.
    I hope that your daughter is doing well. I will keep you and yours in my prayers.
    Blessings dear, Catherine xo

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    1. I did ask marion how she felt, Catherine. she said she remembers when she was about 9 years old and her father took her to the store and they bought loaf bread. she said it was her "job" to carry it home and it was VERY heavy!

      My daughter is doing well, Catherine. Thank you for asking. Prayers are always welcome:)

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  12. Fun post. I always enjoy those vintage recipes and ads. I've not been to Chillicothe, but every elementary school child, at one time or other, toured the Wonder Bread plant. We got a hot, fresh loaf upon departure. It was nothing but a dough ball by the time we all got home. The steam in the bag, combined with excessive handling by rambunctious school children really did it in.

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    1. We use to get free stuff from the Entenmann's factory when we visited with the school. It never made it home though:) Oh those were the days, Pattie...

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  13. Wow Louise--partying again, and so close to the picnic! (What a fun blog friend!) Does Marian remember life without sliced bread during the war? Even though I bake a lot of bread my kids think the commercial sliced bread makes far and away the best sandwiches...

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    1. Marion doesn't remember not having sliced bread during the War, Inger. She said she was too busy trying to figure out how to use the rationing coupons for a family of seven!

      I've never been much of a bread baker so my kids are all too familiar with Wonder and the likes of store bought sliced bread and yes, they love it! However, my grandkids prefer home made sandwich bread because my daughter is quite the bread baker. Go figure!

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  14. Such an informative post, as always! It sure reminds me of the good-old-days of eating bread. Take care, dear!

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    1. Thanks Shirley. So glad you enjoyed it:)

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  15. i, for one, absolutely cannot imagine a world without sliced bread. and i don't want to. :)

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  16. hi louise! i'm not too good either at slicing a loaf of bread and most of the time i tend to slice them thicker than it should be cos i believe thicker is easier than to slice it thin.
    Still not very uniform. At times i wish i have a bread slicer too..but too many gadgets in the house , then wondering if i really really need one..hehe..

    the deluxe bread loaf actually looks like a cake! if someone doesnt like eating cakes, maybe we can make a birthday bread like the deluxe bread loaf :D

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    1. I've often thought it would be nice to have a bread slicer too, Lena. However, there's a very good possibility I won't be baking any bread in the near future, lol...

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  17. Wow, who knew someone from my home state of Iowa invented a bread slicer? Fun facts! I think I'll pass on that bridge loaf, but the veggie club looks delish!!!

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    1. The Veggie club does look good, Liz. Sure is a keeper!

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  18. Ah, sliced bread. Love your nostalgic posts, Louise!

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    1. Thank you Angela. I really enjoy sharing them.

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  19. [ouise Ehat nice and interesting post, my kids love loaf bread :) I prefer rustic bread. but I really love this of course I dont have idea about loaf bread and I try yo remember hoe many years here begin the loaf bread, I think abiut 6o's when I was a child LOL I love loaf bread to sedderts!!
    have a nice day!!





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    1. Well at least you're not older than sliced bread, Gloria, lol...

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  20. Hi Louise ,
    Stopping by for a for some lunch and good conversation ... where you can always find both here .Lots of good information , food and friends to share it with . :)

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    1. I hope you enjoyed your lunch Nee. We sure did like having you join us! Now may we please have a piece of that Yummy Black Forest Cake of yours? Please:)

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  21. Sliced bread sounds so common, and has been implemented only for 85 years...amazing!
    Always learning from your posts Louise :)
    Have a lovely week ahead !

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    1. Thanks Juliana, wishing you a wonderful weekend!

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  22. What an interesting little tidbit about the war! And yes that last picture does look good. I love knowing when sliced bread was invented! I had no clue about how it all came to be. Have a great week Louise!

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    1. I'm delighted you enjoyed your visit Reeni. It's the little things...

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  23. Hi Louise,
    The Sliced Bread has the same birthday with me! Haha! And I have always wanted a bread slicer!
    Thank you for all the info on The Sliced Bread, and I have enjoyed the video very much. So awesome that even as early as 1946, everything is done by the machine! Genius of mankind!
    Thanks for sharing and hope you have a lovely week.

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    1. Happy {belated} Birthday Joyce!!! I thought that video was pretty neat too. So many steps to get a loaf of bread:) Have a GREAT weekend, Joyce!

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  24. Nice to know about the evolution of sliced bread....

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  25. Hi Louise,

    I alway assume that sliced bread had started long time ago before 85 years... I wonder how people eat their bread before 85 years... by tearing or munching the whole loaf??? How about slicing by hand knives??? Some silly thoughts... hee hee

    Zoe

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    1. Silly thoughts? I don't think so Zoe, I think you've come up with all the right answers, lol...

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  26. A great invention! Interesting facts.

    Who doesn't like sandwiches!

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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    1. Thank you Rosa. I for one LOVE sandwiches!

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  27. I loved this post Louise. I've never made that cream cheese loaf but one was served at my wedding shower. Thanks for the walk down memory lane. Have a great day. Blessings...Mary

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    1. I had to laugh to myself, Mary. Definitely a "must have" weeding shower gift in its day!

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  28. Fun post as always, Louise. You come up with the most interesting things. And Marion being older than sliced bread -- Woot!!

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  29. I'm not sure exactly how unsliced bread is more patriotic, but, then again, politicians and bureaucrats always have been idiots. I enjoyed this post; did you know that my boys will only eat sandwiches on commercially made sliced bread or my rolls? They won't slice my loaves (or used bread I sliced) for sandwiches. Foolish boys.

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    1. I think your "foolish" boys are pretty darn smart, Marjie. They know where their bread is buttered, lol...

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  30. I had no idea sliced bread was at 85! Interesting information, thanks for sharing Louise!

    Anne ~ Uni Homemaker

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    1. You never know, Anne. Who "invented" sliced bread just may be the winning Jeopardy question!

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  31. Such an interesting and fun post! Who would have thought?

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    1. Thanks Katerina. My feeling exactly:)

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  32. What an interesting post - I actually had a chuckle at the notion that we call it sliced bread as though the alternative is to tear chunks off a loaf or do as Sylvia sometimes is found to do and just eat into a loaf (she knows I don't like it and does it with mischief in her eyes). Someone was very clever who coined the phrase. And I love the thought that slicing your own bread was one of the ways to support the war!

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    1. Kids just love "tearing" off bread, Johanna. I suppose they could be considered as the "inventors" of sliced bread too:) Thanks for popping by...

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Through this wide opened gate,
none came to early,
none returned to late.

Thanks for dropping in...Louise