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Sunday, July 6, 2014

Guess What? It’s National Fried Chicken Day OR Smoored Pullets Day

I know it’s been a pretty busy weekend for many of you out there. I wouldn’t be surprised to “hear” that you’re stuffed with all kinds of tasty goodies. Between the July 4th holiday, our picnic game round-up and picnic month, National Fried Chicken Day may just over the top.

Wait! Who am I kidding, there’s always room for fried chicken!

We just couldn’t let Picnic Month slip on by without celebrating fried chicken in some form, now could we? As a matter of fact, you might have lasting memories of that Crispy Curry Fried Chicken Joyce brought to our picnic last year. By the time I was ready to dive in, it was all gone!

Someone had to invent the picnic, so it should come as no surprise to fine that the Greeks did it. It was the custom for men of letters to hold reunions, probably to discuss philosophy, with each member of the club providing a part of the meal. Rome, as always quick to absorb lessons from the Greeks, followed suit. The poet Horace left accounts of picnics and the pleasure he took in them. The Southern Heritage Plain and Fancy Poultry Cookbook, ©1983, p. 77

You’ll notice the first item on this picnic menu from Southern Heritage is the American iconic comfort food, Southern Fried Chicken. Now, I don’t want to start any hot debates here but, Southern Fried Chicken is not the only kind of fried chicken on the world’s menu. Heck, it’s quite possible that Southern Fried Chicken may have joined the list of fried chicken status a whole lot later than many other forms of fried chicken. Yes, dear readers, fried chicken has a history:) By most accounts, the cackling history of fried chicken can be traced back to medieval chicken dishes that were prepared by frying pieces of chicken and then braising them in sauce. These dishes were known as fricassees.

One of the first recorded recipes for fried chicken, if not thee first American recorded recipe, appeared in Mary Randolph’s The Virginia Housewife or, Methodical Cook (link is to free online edition) first published in 1824. Although, the recipe for her fried chicken did not appear until 1834. This recipe is from the online edition of 1836.

If you just can’t go on another day without knowing the rich history of fried chicken in America, may I suggest John T. Edge’s book Fried Chicken: An American Story. I actually didn’t know the book existed until I read a few reviews on Amazon. I have since added it to my list of “must haves.”

In The Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink, John F. Mariani devotes almost an entire page to Southern Fried Chicken. I found this paragraph to be quite interesting…

…The Scottish, who enjoyed frying their chickens rather than boiling or baking them as the English did, may have brought the method with them when they settled the South. The efficient and simple cooking process was very well adapted to the plantation life of the southern African-American slaves, who were often allowed to raise their own chickens. Louisiana African Americans called a breakfast of fried chicken and grits a “Sunday Breakdown…”

I just happen to have a cookbook titled The Highlanders Cookbook filled with recipes from Scotland. And, look what I found within its pages; Smoored Pullets! (I’m thinking “smoor” means butter in Scottish:)

Like most chicken recipes, Fried Chicken is as versatile as the cook who prepares it. On this blog, I have explored the history of Harland Sanders and his Kentucky Fried Chicken, which is more of a technique of pressure cooked chicken rather than fried chicken. I’ve also shared Pearl Bailey’s Mama’s Fried Chicken and of course Aunt Bee’s Fried Chicken which is dipped in eggs before it’s fried. I have left the links to those pages and others in the resource section below:) Throughout the world, different seasoning and spices are used to wing out the best of fried chicken. Have fun exploring them all on Fried Chicken Day. Louise:)

I'm slowly adding everyone back to my sidebar, I miss it!

Resources
1. Pollo Fritto-Italian-style fried chicken with fried herbs and artichoke hearts (from Bon Appetit)
2. Haitian Fried Chicken - Poul Fri
3. Chicken Karaage (Japanese Fried Chicken)
4. Korean Fried Chicken (Yangnyeom Chikin)
5. Backhendl-Viennese Fried Chicken
6. Best Buttermilk Fried Chicken
7. Great Chefs of New Orleans: Austin Leslie’s Fried Chicken with Persillade
8. Unfried Chicken
9. Good Old Fashioned Fried Chicken
Previously Posted
1. Harland Sanders & KFC
2. Pearl Bailey’s Mama's Fried Chicken
3. Celebrating "The New Housekeeper"
Chicken pieces courtesy of wiki

34 comments:

  1. Wow u r making me drool over all those crispilicious looking fried chicken, louise

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    1. I actually made fried chicken for this post Jenn but, Marion gobbled it up before I had a chance to take a picture!

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  2. Even before breakfast, that sounds really tempting. I feel sorry for the cooks who had to deep fry in hot summer weather.

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    1. Hi Mae,
      Yes, I'm sure it was no picnic way back when in no air conditioning!

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  3. Hi Louise, that is one thing I love about chicken, so many different ways to make it. I enjoyed reading the history of fried chicken. I think that fried chicken is always a yummy choice when it comes to a picnic.

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    1. Delighted you enjoyed the fried chicken and its history, Dawn. It was a fun post for me too:)

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  4. we have been vegetarians since decades but can certainly celebrate this day with fried tofu/paneer instead....the crisp exterior and tender insides made fried chicken a favorite while we savored it and we feel so hungry....will be making a batch of fried paneer soon,thanks :-)

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    1. Hi Kumar,
      My son is a vegetarian too. Fried Tofu would be a great idea for him. I really should make him some. Let me know when you share the recipe:)

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  5. I haven't made fried chicken in ages! And I've had it on my list of things to blog about from day 1 of the blog. Still don't know when I'm going to get to it, but I should, and soon. I prefer pan-fried chicken to deep fried, but I'll take either one -- they're both so delish! Fun post -- thanks.

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  6. Dear Louise,
    Happy National Fried Chicken Day! You got it, there is always room for fried chicken of any kind. What an informative post on the history of this yummy finger food. I love fried chicken, but I have to say, at a picnic it is the best. I am going to check into Aunt Bee’s Fried Chicken and Pearl Bailey’s Mama’s Fried Chicken, Thanks for the links. Another fabulous post to gives us "Food for thought" Blessings on a great day..
    Dottie :)

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  7. Hi Louise, Thank you for sharing all the amazing history about the fried chicken, and especially the PICNIC, and not forgetting to bring your finger lickin' good crispy fried chicken! Did not know the Greeks invented picnic...wow! Hope you enjoyed the holiday weekend! xo

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  8. You know there is nothing quite like fried chicken. Not exactly health food, but seriously tasty! Always time for more picnic food! (And I like your sidebar too)

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  9. Hi Louise , your post was terrific as usual and 'Fried Chicken' is a must anytime . Think I will fry some tomorrow , family love the legs and wings . (((HUGS))) to you and Marion . Thanks for sharing :).
    PS : Like your new 'Header' .

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  10. Fried chicken day? :) I had no idea that there is such day, if I would have known I would have had fried chicken today :D

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  11. I am now craving fried chicken!

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  12. Mouthwatering! Interesting facts...

    Cheers,

    Rosa

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  13. drooling over this super yummy chicken..thanks for sharing..

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  14. I'm on board with fried chicken, Louise! Great picnic food. I haven't made it in quite a while.

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  15. Wooow!! I wish I could give a bite to that crunchy and juicy chicken leg! This is one of the best American recipes ever! And I would be very happy to take this on a picnic too :-)

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  16. Gosh, my saliva is dripping all over my deak. Lol! I'm a sucker for fried chicken & I adore KFC. Oh, dear, I'm so hungry after reading your post. What should I do now??

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  17. making a good fried chicken is an art, and that's the truth. i need more practice in making it (but not in eating it). :)

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  18. That looms like the best, Louise! Wish we lived next door because I might be walking up with my plate this evening! I will do the dishes, I promise!

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  19. I do enjoy fried chicken. That said, my dearly beloved will not let me fry anything. His reasoning? My skin is very white, thin and delicate and he doesn't want his wife burned by splattering oil. It's kinda silly, but sweet at the same time.

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  20. There is a restaurant here in Chattanooga that is supposed to have the best fried chicken. I can not wait to try it.

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  21. Grandma's fried chicken was always the best!

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  22. OMG, I wish I could go through the screen for that drumstick...it look so good. Although I do not fry at home, I love it when eating out and once in a while I indulge myself with fried chicken.
    Thanks for organizing the picnic...I love it!
    Have a wonderful week Louise :D

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  23. I haven't fried up any chicken in years! But I think I MUST put it on the menu soon. Thanks for the inspiration, my friend!

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  24. This post made my mouth water Louise. I could not stop staring at that first picture!

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  25. Louise - great post with lots of enjoyable info - thanks! I make fried chicken only rarely, because of the trouble and calories, but I do dearly love it! Now I want some :)
    Donalyn@ http://thecreeksidecook.com

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  26. I don't know anyone who can resist a crispy and crunchy piece of fried chicken. This post certainly has made me hungry. :)

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  27. hi louise, i can never resist good fried chicken..looking at the pics above only makes me hungry ..I wonder if you feel the same when you were typing this post out :)...and smoored pullets sound easy and delicious!

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  28. Wow - all that fried chicken looks downright luscious, Louise! I've never really tried to make fried chicken, although I've roasted a good number of birds in my time. Now, why do I think that if I tried this, I would bread my chicken with Corn Flakes?

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Through this wide opened gate,
none came to early,
none returned to late.

Thanks for dropping in...Louise